Bass on the Fly

34825384_1705898836153892_4592457879339925504_o

I’ve had the topwater on the fly rod ‘bug’ lately, and got out on the river yesterday for several hours.

Every year I get out the fly rod around May and start chucking bugs at the bank. But this year has been different. The action, at least with the bream, has been non-stop. It’s fun having constant engagement with these fish when they are crushing bugs on top of the water. At times every cast is met with a greeting; even if not a full take…

34823305_1705898852820557_3422852600041570304_o

But yesterday there were tons of takes, and the bass came to play as well; especially as the final hours of light cast their long shadows and the sun neared bed for the day.

35151768_1705898872820555_5578716309056651264_o

I started out catching bream by the dozens, literally cast after cast. They were all stripped in, none big enough for a long enough run to get on the reel, but a ton of fun nonetheless.

IMG_0340

After an hour or so, the first bass took a popper…

IMG_0368

Then it was back to bream heaven…

IMG_0341

I decided around 6pm to paddle up to a set of rapids and boulders a good ways from the launch and rested a while. But it wasn’t long before I saw the clock hit 7pm and decided to start plugging the foamy areas in search of the largemouth bass. And I found them…finally a fish got on the reel…after a crushing take, I strip-set the bass and the fight was on…

35151462_1705898856153890_5549695781973262336_o

34984334_1705899819487127_3118777200476684288_o

IMG_0365

 

Such a fun day on the river…I think I’ll go again now!

Advertisements

Jordan Lake Report

32294508_1679275458816230_6382858530466037760_o

Striped bass and white bass were chewing good on Jordan Lake this past weekend.

I didn’t have the highest of hopes for the fishing before this weekend arrived. Weather reports were clear blue-bird skies, with very little predicted cloud cover and HOT. Luckily, Saturday there were storms forming south and east of the lake throughout the day, so the pressure was moving… The large, multi-cloud-form goliaths hovered all day and loomed large late, but never drenched us. Lightning started coming from the thunderheads as we trailered the boat though.

32313829_1678752635535179_7743180325009752064_o

Captain Stu and I got on the lake around 3pm Saturday and started catching fish right off. We found a very big white bass, close to 16”, after finding good sonar marks in an area with light boat traffic. The fish hit so hard we thought it was a striper, but when we saw the tall profile as it came boatside, I yelled, “I’m having fish tacos for dinner!”

32294645_1678683625542080_5938294119288799232_o

We ran though the area a few more times, but it was still early, so without another taker we moved on. And we found fish again and again, literally everywhere we trolled the rest of the afternoon. Bait balls are already on the main lake….

We followed the fish from deeper water to shallower water as the evening wore on and though we caught a ton of nice white bass, a few perch and a really nice crappie, we only found one striped bass just short of a keeper. But it was still a nice fish and fight; Stu got the honor…

32349752_1678732722203837_2969805057224081408_o

32453870_1678683628875413_6439788304794648576_o

32447359_1678688322208277_6588541280161103872_o

We fished til near dark, and continued catching, it was an afternoon of chinese fire-drills for sure; multiple double and triple hookups resulting in the two of us working our tails off… Then finally, exhausted, we hit the ramp. I cleaned the fish once home and had fried fish by 10:30pm lol; long day; then I woke at 4:15am to go again with my friend and his girlfriend.

Well, we did have plans….good ones!

Dawn was beautiful…

32460120_1679275462149563_5333775505281777664_o

We had our kayaks in motion before dawn and started pulling hardware before the sun was up. And we started catching fish right off. Stripers, white bass, crappie, catfish and perch attacked our lures the entire time we fished, and like the day prior, literally everywhere we fished.

32350083_1679451248798651_4033808184614322176_o

32349268_1679449052132204_8192752165542952960_o

32402290_929953307178763_8414158992372137984_n

IMG_0197

IMG_0200

IMG_0205

All the stripers were short, though we landed maybe 20 between the three of us. Then there were the white bass, which we caught a ton of. And although we all caught near citation specimens, Erin caught the biggest. This fish had to be 2 pounds and close to 16 or 17”. She fought it a good while, so it gave me time to cruise over to her and snap a few shots. (Below & feature photo)

32392186_1679275472149562_593085020223045632_o

Her man was busy racking up numbers as well; he landed at least 3 in the 15” range. Perhaps the new regs on the white bass are working, I’ve noted bigger fish per catch the last 2 years, and this was the first time in a while I’ve had a couple days catching the numbers we did.

32327480_930060700501357_394903156032536576_n

32381101_930060767168017_558871615685787648_n

After fishing the majority of the morning in fairly shallow water, we followed the fish to deeper water and caught them in a variety of ways; mostly trolling though. We used crankbaits, sassy shads, bucktails and spinner baits and hooked up at pretty fast speeds; luckily our adrenaline was pumping!

We released every single one of the critters, and after the crowds and the heat started up just before noon, we hit the ramp and split. Pretty good weekend.

2018 Spring Fishing Report

31606581_1666744386736004_2504549434939932672_o

The fishing on area lakes is finally starting to heat up.

I’ve hit Falls, Jordan and Gaston lakes over the last few weeks, and here is what I’ve found.

Falls Lake was still slightly stained from recent rains a couple weeks ago. I launched mid-lake and found white bass feeding right off in 15 feet of water. They were taking small inline spinners trolled slowly across points and humps. Catfish and perch were also taken off submerged trees with metal spoons in similar water depths.

IMG_0066

IMG_0063IMG_0070

Gaston Lake was slow, as water temps there were struggling to rise. Stripers were non-existant at the mid lake level and all reports indicate the fish are still in the northern extents of the lake on spanwing grounds. Anglers have had success trolling live shad, very slowly, as well as bucktails early and late. Water flow, as usual, is key there in the waters leading to the back of Kerr Lake dam.

I hit Jordan Lake yesterday, on the last day of April, and found striped bass, white perch, castfish and crappie feeding fairly well. The fish hit trolled crankbaits, sassy shads on jigheads, and small metal spoons jigged vertically.

IMG_0111

IMG_0099

IMG_0102

IMG_0109IMG_0112

IMG_0113

The fish were staging in 15-20 feet of water, but there were some moving around a bit. I found no fish feeding shallow that day, but bass anglers have been hitting the flooded banks, and flipping soft plastics with success. Crappie are also being taken shallow, but mine hit a fairly large Bomber crankbait in deeper water.

So, the fishing isn’t white hot yet, but with temperatures hitting close to 90 later this week, I’d say it’s about to pop off. This weekend should be fantastic, wherever you decide to venture.

 

 

Spring Stripers, White bass & Crappie

crappie1

I got out on Jordan Lake this afternoon and found striped bass, white bass and crappie feeding heavily.

It was a perfect afternoon; the cloud cover was thick, rain was light to non-existent, and the wind was light. I couldn’t stand it.

Launched the kayak around 1:00 and started into a narrow area I’ve found fish laying before. I started with both rods rigged with KVD 1.0’s; the pics will show what happened…after just a few moments, one of the rods bounced, and I decided to reel it in and make sure it was clean; the area I was fishing was shallow and there was no reason to pull crap around. But on the retrieve, as I was approaching a fast rate, the rod doubled over with my first striped bass of 2018.

100_1752

I didn’t want to be disrespectful to the fishing Gods, so I tossed it back after a quick pic.

Then after a few more minutes, and having no luck, I thought to myself, I’ve seen this movie before, let’s speed this up, and within seconds this nice crappie joined the party. Well it is spring….burn em!!!!

100_1753

After that, the pattern had revealed itself and the fish repeatedly fell prey to the same technique. Stripers, catfish, perch, crappie, and white bass couldn’t resist the tiny crankbaits.

100_1754

100_1755

100_1756

100_1757

Then, after a short break, cuz my legs were burning…my first double of the year, a duo of white perch that were far more trouble to document than they were worth…

100_1758

I was releasing everything today, and these were no exception.

Then…more stripers!

100_1759

And the clouds got really scenic for a bit…

100_1768.JPG

100_1767.JPG

They seemed to roll in some direction I was supposed to follow, so I did, and then…bam!!

100_1769

And then…bam again!!

100_1770

At this point it was kind of embarrassing.

100_1771

 

 

 

 

More Cedar Scrimshaw Commissions

100_1740

I’ve been catching up on more cedar scrimshaw commissions over the last few weeks.

The piece above is a cardinal one of my neighbors wanted. She didn’t want any flowers, but agreed to allow for a tree branch… This particular piece, as with the last few bird inspired scrimshaws, has no etching, nor does it have any inked lines at all. This seems to make these particular pieces appear more realistic.

I also got a Grateful Dead, Steal Your Face piece done for another client, and this one is totally engraved. He still has to decide if he wants any color, or if he wants to keep it simply line art.

100_1722

And then I did this one for a very special person…

100_1701

This one does have some lines inked, but only in the darker areas, and there is no engraving, save the signature on the back. It’s my favorite hummingbird to date.

Then, I had another good friend who needed a cedar board and help with finishing it. He had a cast iron replica of an old car passed down to him by his grandfather. So we cut a piece to size, belt-sanded the rough cut lines and then mounted the car. This was a fun little project and I was honored to help preserve and display the piece.

100_1715.JPG

100_1709

100_1711

So the new mill is getting worked out and I’ll have more project updates soon!

Milling an Eastern Red Cedar Log

27164088_1568333923243718_679338887178489810_o

I finally got the ripping chain for my chainsaw; let the milling of eastern red cedar slabs begin…

The four boards (above) were milled today from the same eastern red cedar log. I bartered a job with a customer for a dead-standing tree on their property, a few years ago, and this log has been waiting to show what it has hidden within ever since.

At first, as I was trying to get the feel for this new contraption, I rocked the saw back and forth while cutting because it was quicker. That is a mistake, and will only result in more sanding time. I quickly realized I had to trust the system, and push, straight-armed to gain maximum control, and maintain as steady a speed on the saw as possible. This gave me the smoother lines as evidenced in the center two pieces from the feature photograph.

I would say, it is crucial not to overrun your saw. I have run and owned multiple chainsaws, over many years, and I did use a ripping chain, and additionally cedar is in fact a soft wood. However, my saw almost overheated a few times as I became familiar with the speed I could run it while cutting with the grain, as opposed to cross-cut. Make sure your saw isn’t smoking, and if it does, shut it down and let it cool immediately.

Here was the beginning of the process after assembling the mill to the saw.

100_1587

I used an old u-channel post for a rail for the first cut; simply screwed through the holes, which were already provided, and leveled.

100_1586

100_1588

100_1590

The first cut was rough, but I had a feel for the setup and made adjustments. I used braces and screws to stabilize the piece and continued.

100_1591.jpg

These are really going to be rewarding to work with. Stay tuned!

100_1593

 

 

Don’t Get Sick, Get Echinacea

echinacea-005

Getting sick plain out stinks. So don’t. Get Echinacea.

Most people I know may have heard of echinacea before, but they don’t know much about it. For over a decade now, I’ve used it to fight colds and flu. But here’s the thing, you don’t fight off the symptoms of the colds and sickness, you simply never get sick in the first place, and I have used it with almost complete success for a long time. But there is a secret to using echinacea.

So I’m going to start out the New Year by giving up a seriously well-kept secret. I don’t know why it’s a secret; it shouldn’t be. I don’t even recall how I learned about this wonder-herb, but luckily for me, the person who divulged the herb to me, also thought it pertinent to tell me how to use it.

Echinacea is a flowering plant in the daisy family found only in eastern and central North America – lucky us. The leaves and flowers are edible and the plant, in its entirety, have been used in medicinal tinctures for longer than any of us have been alive.

Now if you go online and read about echinacea, you will come across a great variance of information; some pro and some con, but I will tell you only of my experience with it and what has worked for me. As with any drug, herb or substance you are not familiar with, proceed with as much information as you can.

I have never had any sort of reaction but awesomeness from echinacea.

So here is the trick.

Echinacea is not to be used like a vitamin. Your body will quickly build a tolerance for it and you will not receive the plant’s vital qualities when you need them. So here is my criteria for administering the herb.

First, keep it on-hand. It’s cheap and readily available at your grocery store, and no, I have seen no difference in the effectiveness of any one brand over any other. In fact, I would recommend always using different brands of products, once you use up a container, for varying reasons. I like to get a new bottle every year.

Second, only use echinacea if you have been in contact with a sick person. Do not use it as a daily supplement. It will not hurt you to do so, but as already has been stated, the herb will lose its effectiveness if this is done.

So here is what I would recommend. Let’s say you and the family have been visiting friends or neighbors over the holidays, and their ‘little Johnny’ was feverish and you could actually see the germs flying towards you while you celebrated with your friends. As soon as you get home, take one pill, or however many the brand you select says is a single dose, and eat a little something with it. Do this with each meal, at least 3 times a day for the next 3 days. Do not delay, if you don’t have it at home, stop and get it on the way back. Don’t wait one meal, or the germs will certainly do their job.

I have, a few times, woke up in the morning with a sore throat (sinus draining) and hadn’t known I’d come across a sick person (probably random contact with a door knob) and started the above treatment and staved the cold off. Once I did that a few times I was a serious believer.  However, if I had waited a day to start taking the herb, I am sure it would have been a waste.

That’s it. It really is that simple. I hope this helps!