Fort Fisher Plundering

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photo: Doug McNay

Three members of my family hit the grass flats at Fort Fisher, NC this past weekend.

My brother, mother and myself launched our kayaks from the beach side as the tide was starting to come in. We made our way across a waterway and soon found ourselves surrounded by big, blue sky and light-green grass-lined banks that stretched in all directions.

We tried throwing skitterwalks on top for a little while, but no one hooked up. However, we could see that bait and fish were present. My brother started throwing spinnerbaits and mirrorlures, while I resorted to fresh shrimp rigged on a carolina-rig with a 1oz weight.

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Joey and Mom started into a few channels, still using artificials, and I posted up on a set of small islands of grass. I cut the shrimp into tiny offerings and lobbed a cast at the middle of the triple-chain to my right. It wasn’t a few seconds and fish were biting. I almost never fish with live or dead bait in freshwater, but when hitting these remote salty areas, I like to up my chances on blue-bird days. I’ve learned over the years these types of days can be difficult, as far as angling, and the effort to reach the destinations is extreme, so I will gladly take the ego-punch and defer to more reliable means to fill a cooler, and have a blast in the process.

The first area provided a few small croakers, but seemed void of any larger predator fish, so I broke my grass knot and moved further into the marsh. I never take an anchor in there anymore, the grass is easily tied into a knot around a kayak handle, which makes for a silent-makeshift-anchor, and less gear in the boat. It can be a little itchy sometimes, but its easily dealt with when you find yourself out of the wind, motionless, and catching fish.

I moved as quietly as I could through the many channels and found another spot that looked really active. Bait was present, some mullet were breaching the surface, and I could see swirls that looked to be drum. It was another area with many features, rather than an even-lined channel. I tied to the left side of an island, with another island to my back, and a channel cutting through straight ahead.

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One cast to the point just before the channel, and within a moment, my rod was bouncing wildly. Drag peeled off the 7′ outfit, and I knew I had a drum on. The fish fought for several minutes, darting across the water in spurts, before I saw it was not a red drum, but a large-shouldered black drum. It’s dark vertical lines gave it’s identity away. These fish fight and taste almost exactly like their cousins the redfish, except they have bigger shoulders and a taller profile.

After boat-flipping the fish, I unhooked it quickly and put it on ice. And after another cast to the same spot, another drum quickly inhaled the bait. The same process was repeated and I had a second fish-taco-supplier aboard my craft. I casted again a few times, but both fish had put up quite a ruckus, so the area filled with pinfish, the dreaded bait-stealers. I figured the area could use a rest, so I went to find my family.

They were at the end of the channel section we had entered and posted up on two opposing points. Joey had caught a nice keeper redfish, and a few rats, and Mom had also resorted to shrimp, but had found the pinfish that came in on me. We tried that area a while, and Joey caught a keeper flounder, but the wind picked up and I talked them into going back to the area I had left to rest.

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I got Mom to get into a spot across from the point where I’d caught the black drum, and I positioned myself across from her, on the other side of the point. She threw her bait in and was immediately hooked up. Something was really giving her a tustle, and Joey paddled to her to assist. I was sure it was a big red drum, but after a little while they determined it was a big stingray.

She was a little disappointed, but we told her to throw back in there. From then on, she kinda kicked our butts. I mean, Joey and I still caught more fish, but she repeatedly hooked up and landed red rum, black drum, pinfish, and croakers. It was really fun to watch her fight all those underwater denizens, especially since we were celebrating our birthdays. And she loves fresh fish as much as we do.

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Soon, the water started to rush out on us though, and we had to retreat quickly to avoid being stranded in the marsh. But we had a great day and two coolers full of fish! So we opted to head home and join other family members in celebration. It was a great weekend.

Love the family and grass-flats!

 

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8 thoughts on “Fort Fisher Plundering

  1. I have never heard of anyone catching and keeping Drum. I’m from the Midwest, so Crappie, Bass, Catfish, Bluegill are the most common species – an occasional Drum but never heard of anyone keeping them. Interesting – how are they to eat?

    Liked by 1 person

  2. These are saltwater red drum and black drum. They’re fantastic. I wouldn’t eat freshwater drum… Google redfish and you’ll see they are many people’s favorite saltwater fish, especially tablefare, the blackened recipee almost had the fish extinct in our recent past. That’s why we have a 1 fish per person limit and a slot on them here in NC

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Ah – that makes sense. I wasn’t thinking saltwater. Freshwater Drum is kind of in the same category as carp here in the Midwest. I did some Trout fishing this weekend and did pretty well. Be the last fishing of the season though. Thanks for the response. Fish on!!

    Like

  4. More than one birthday there ?
    I went back to the Illinois river valley for my niece ( 2nd LT. Navy ) , her b-day was the 15th,
    mine the 17th. I did buy a 3 day license to target some saugers , a walleye cousin , but too much rain fell
    the night before.
    Way cool you all get out and fish, catching them no surprise either. Another great post.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Thanks Don. Yes, lots of scorpios here…Mom’s just past and mine is the 30th, so since they live at the coast we celebrate them at the same time. Too bad about the rain. But, I got two deer down already, haven’t had a chance to post about that yet. A doe opening day of rifle and a 6pt last week after work. It’s been a great fall so far, lots of dehydrating and grinding and grilled steaks…Let’s get together and do a surf and turf…

    Like

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